Your browser version is outdated. We recommend that you update your browser to the latest version.



Happening Now

09/20/2015

Matoluta Sanctuary makes strides in finding homes for abandoned horses.  See what's happening today on facebook

Like us on Facebook

09/21/2015

Please join your voice with ours and help us save horses.  The time to act is now before it is too late.

Washington  Horse Defense Coalition

  Contact Us

   Matoluta Horse Conservation

   22315 W. Hickory Dr.

   Sapulpa, OK 74066

   Phone 405 237 2327

Matoluta

Horses played a big part in today's modern world. Without them we would be savages.

Matoluta Sanctuary is dedicated to educating about the need to conserve horses.  We will highlight many other efforts to preserve  the noble horse. 

America's Heritage Threatened

Many breeds of horses are in danger of extinction. The Mustang of legend is the Spanish Colonial Horse. Eventually some escaped from the Spanish and were such a sturdy horse, they were more than adequate for living wild and free. From them the Native American people were able to expand and a whole new way of life came about for those nations. This versatile breed was well suited as draft horses, good mounts and sturdy pack horses, so they were bred by the Spanish in the late 1400s to withstand the long ship voyage and provide our forebears the means of exploring the Americas. They are truly a heritage species which should be protected. In the early '70s they were vanishing from the lands alarmingly fast, recognizing this they were granted protection under the Wild Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act so that they would endure.

This act declares them a national treasure "wild free-roaming horses and burros are living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West; that they contribute to the diversity of life forms within the Nation and enrich the lives of the American people; and that these horses and burros are fast disappearing from the American scene. It is the policy of Congress that wild free-roaming horses and burros shall be protected from capture, branding, harassment, or death; and to accomplish this they are to be considered in the area where presently found, as an integral part of the natural system of the public lands."

They were allocated Herd Management Areas in parts of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah and Wyoming. The BLM was tasked with conserving these horses but now their numbers are even lower than in the '70s while the Bureau of Land Management has since reduced these areas by over 20 million acres, and yet continue to remove them by means which many consider to be inhumane. Of the land which had been set apart for them, the BLM furnishes 90% of that allocated land for cattle which accounts for a bit over 2% of the beef supply for the US, removing wild horses, consigning them to holding facilities and there is a documented incident of BLM horses ending up in Mexican Slaughterhouses bound for the table of humans. We owe so much to horses throughout our entire history that we should not consider them a food animal. In fact, horses are given treatment with drugs that are toxic to humans if they ingest horse meat laden with these substances.

Currently the BLM is holding more of these horses in poorly managed facilities than actually exist in the wild. To our mind this agency has failed miserably in providing the protection that is due them. The time to act is now. Make your position known to your congressman, to your representatives. These horses are truly a national treasure and having failed to recognizing this shows the neglect afforded them by our government.  Something we can not allow as aware and responsible citizens.

Go to this link https://www.opencongress.org/people/zipcodelookup to find your senator today and ask where they stand on this historical issue, asking them what they will do to keep these horses in the National Trust, protected and admired.

Today, our wild horses are sold, often to kill buyers for slaughter 

Have a word with your congress person and be a voice for horses.